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Court Interpreter Program Webcasts

  • 2020 COURT INTERPRETERS! THE GOOD, THE BAD…AND THE UGLY (CI, J, CA, M/S, C)

    Course Effective Date: February 12, 2020

    Course Description: Credentialed court interpreters serve as a conduit between Limited English Proficient (LEP) court users and English-speaking officials in legal forums. The goal of a court interpreter is to enable the judge and jury to react in the same manner to a LEP speaking person as they do with one who speaks English. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Executive Order 13166 provides the right for language access and thereby affording LEP court users fair access to justice.

    During this training, Ms. Escobar provides a basic overview of the role of a certified court interpreter. She will discuss the different types of interpretation, ethical responsibilities, the brain science and multilingual language control in simultaneous interpretation, and other tools of the trade.

  • 2017 ETHICS IN THE COURTROOM FOR COURT INTERPRETERS (CI, J, CA, M/S, C)

    Free Recorded Webcast (September 18, 2017)

    Course Description: During this session, presenters will review the "Code of Professional Responsibility for Nevada Court Interpreters". The training will outline the 10 different areas of the Nevada Code of Professional Responsibility and discuss various ethical considerations for credentialed court interpreters.

  • 2017 UNDERSTANDING AND PREVENTING VICARIOUS TRAUMA AND COMPASSION FATIGUE IN THE COURT COMMUNITY (J, SJ, CA, M/S, C)

    (Recorded May 23, 2017)

    Training Description: We are individually and collectively affected by trauma through the work we do each day. We are traumatized by what we see, hear, and read and by the questions we must ask and the answers we receive. Most of us have lived with the message that “if we care enough, we’ll tough it out.” We are learning very quickly that we have been deceiving each other and ourselves with such a mantra. In fact, the toll that trauma takes is significant and serious. As representatives of the courts, we cannot be delinquent in tending to our needs while embracing our roles as public servants.